French listening practice: Cézanne recreates the ‘open-air’ experience indoors

From the FluentListener newsletter
Direct link for members : L’Atelier de Paul Cézanne à Aix

Hello All,
To help you with your listening habit: 2 minutes of listening today – play this sound 8 times.

It doesn’t matter if you hear one word or all of them. All that matters is that you learn to recognize one or two new words today.


Link for members to the full transcript.

French listening: african art and the birth of cubism

From the FluentListener newsletter
Direct link for members : Art history interview: African Art’s influence on 20th century painting and sculpture

Hello All,
To help you with your listening habit: 2 minutes of listening today – play this sound 8 times.

It doesn’t matter if you hear one word or all of them. All that matters is that you learn to recognize one or two new words today.

text for recording
Thanks to all of you who have joined! Having your support helps me finance new interviews and improvements to the site. For those of you considering full access, please click here for details on what you get.

Best regards,
David Tolman
David.Tolman@FluentListener.com
FluentListener.com

2 minutes of French listening: très, très proches de…

From the FluentListener newsletter
Direct link for members : Art history interview: African Art’s influence on 20th century painting and sculpture

Hello All,
To help you with your listening habit: 2 minutes of listening today – play this sound 8 times.

It doesn’t matter if you hear one word or all of them. All that matters is that you learn to recognize one or two new words today.

text for recording

Thanks to all of you who have joined! Having your support helps me finance new interviews and improvements to the site. For those of you considering full access, please click here for details on what you get.

Best regards,
David Tolman
David.Tolman@FluentListener.com
FluentListener.com

Liaisons in French – hear 3 liaisons in a real conversation

From the FluentListener newsletter

Hello All,
To help you with your listening habit: 2 minutes of listening today – play this sound 6 times.

To see today’s listening tips, scroll down. They are under the transcript.

For members: link to the full interview: Saint Exupéry and l’Aéropostale

Today’s listening comprehension tips

This one features an oft-heard expression: when a merchant has way too much inventory on hand, it’s not “sur la main” or but rather “sur les bras” (literally, “on the arms.”)
Also…

  • 3rd line and again on the 4th line of French: listen for the T in “est arrivé.” This is the liaison that helps the listener clearly identify the two separate words. (If there were no liaison, the sound of est arrivé would become éarrivé: mush in the mouth and likely to cause confusion when spoken quickly.) If you want to compare with T’s that are not spoken, compare to the following non-pronounced Ts:
    • line 1: il s’est retrouvé. The T in s’est does not need to be pronounced because there is no confusion possible: the R clearly marks the start of retrouvé.
    • line 6: il s’est donc retrouvé. Same reason: the D helps us clearly hear the start of the next word – donc.
    • line 7: il s’est dit. Again, no liaison because no risk of confusion: no matter how quickly a French person says ilsédi, a French listener will hear ‘il s’est dit.’
  • 4th line: listen for the T of vite. It is clear because of the pronunciation of the e at the end of the word. It is a bit clearer than the one at the end of the 3rd line, spoken by our reporter. The mistake you want to avoid is this: as an American, if I didn’t know better, I would tend to pronounce vite as veed. (Instead of pronouncing the T clearly, I would make a D sound and move on. That T needs to be heard.)
  • 7th line of French: notice the pronunciation of the T in dont : another liaison, helping us avoid an incomprehensible a string of vowel sounds.

Best regards,
David Tolman
David.Tolman@FluentListener.com
FluentListener.com

Think in French: use “permet de” in a sentence

From the FluentListener newsletter

Hello All,
The next time you speak French, I’d like you to slip a nice “permet de” into the conversation, okay?

Be nonchalant: make it sound as if you use these words all of the time.

To help you do it, I’d like you to echo this recording 6 times. (This is a slow re-reading, not the original, of course.)

For best results, close your eyes and picture that kitchen as you say the words.

Good luck!

translation

Here is another sample from that interview.
https://fluentlistener.com/french-listening-comprehension-exercise-renting-a-country-cottage-in-provence/

Best regards,
David Tolman
Picture of David
David.Tolman@FluentListener.com
FluentListener.com